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That’s What You Call Hunting?

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Hunters often get a bad rep and being a “hunter” is a claim that anyone with a licence and a gun shooting at animals call themselves. Yet, if you ask true and genuine hunters, it’s not the case. Hunters who love the sport do it out of love for the sport as well as for the meat that they hope to harvest. They don’t hunt just for killing animals. They respect the game they’re after. They respect nature and they obey by law. By doing so, not only do they contribute to conservation of the species, but they are out there enjoying the outdoors, admiring what nature has to offer whether or not they “kill”. Hunting is NOT a sport to them. Hunting is a way of life, an appreciation of what it has to offer.

Living in British Columbia, I get to enjoy the openliness of the land. Here, you are free to hunt on most Crown Land and there is more of it than one will ever need. Living in BC also means respecting and appreciating that logging is one of the province’s biggest industries. Unfortunately though, hunters and loggers share the same playing field, and the Ministry of Forest is too busy getting caught in their big wheel red tape and bureaucracy to get out in the field and monitor the destruction those logging companies are doing. Knowing that they are rarely monitored, logging outfits will risk the odd “fine” for logging across creeks and wildlife habitats with little to no respect for the environment off which they make a living, as everything is done in the name of greed and money. Yes, I just said that.

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One of my treestands, 16′ up in the air

A huge collateral damage the logging industry is creating is the laziest scum on the surface of the hunting territories: the Road Hunter. You know, those guys at the office telling you that they’re going hunting? Yeah well, ask them to be more specific. They call themselves “hunters” because they have a Possession and Acquisition Licence (PAL) and they buy tags to harvest deer or any other prey they’re after. You know what many of them do? Go for a drive up in the hills in BC and watch them do “their thing”. I do. They sit in their truck, driving and following the highway-like roads loggers open for their clear-cut destruction and look for the vulnerable young bucks too dumb to seek cover… and they do that all day and yet, they call it hunting. “Yup, got my buck this year again”, one told me about the two-point Mule deer he shot after putting his beer down in his cup holder in his truck. “What did you get?”, he asked me.

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My girlfriend walking in one of the trails.

Let me tell you what I got. I got to go out in the bush in the summer months, prior to fire season. I went out and cut trails. I built a treestand or two. I might have build a blind as well. I squeezed in a little fishing in a remote lake that you will never see because it means walking a couple of kilometers with a u-boat on your shoulders, enjoying a few rainbow trouts.

When Fall and hunting season opened, I drove my truck to a place where I park it every year. I then unloaded my quad, put my gun on the rack in front, and took off to one of my trails, you know, the ones that I cut in the summer? I walked carefully for a few kilometers, trying to avoid branches, twigs on the ground, in hope to see that elusive buck around the bend. I went and froze my butt in my treestand, barely moving, enjoying the squirrel gathering nuts, the partridge and other birds around me. I watch the does walk below me, unaware that I’m watching them. I use my grunt call in hope that a buck is around and, later in the season, I might rattle a little bit to make them think that other bucks are battling it out.

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The view from another treestand.

You know? Hunting? The game behind the game. The strategy, the preparation, the sense of fulfillment and the gratitude of being able to be out there and enjoy every minute in nature. Appreciating sunrises and sunsets alike. The beauty that Mother Nature is providing to us. The little things in life. Simplicity. Quietness, away from trucks and noise. Wait… here you come, again… throwing  your empty can out your window. Worse, you have your young son and/or daughter in the passenger seat, teaching them to “hunt”. To you I say: “Give your head a shake. You’re not a hunter,  you’re a predator on wheels. Never will you have my respect.”

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Harvest and camp. The true experience.

My ex father-in-law is 83 years old and he got out of his truck, unloaded his quad and got himself a nice buck again this year. You, in your 20’s, 30’s, 40’s… sitting in your truck calling yourself a hunter. What did  YOU do? I know what you did… I was watching your lazy butt. If only Forestry did their job and got the logging companies to comply with the laws in every cut block, and deactivate roads when they’re done. If only they limited the amount of logging done in certain areas… perhaps deer would live long enough to get bigger and healthier in our BC forests. What? One can only dream, no?

On the lighter side, I came upon this song and it did put a smile on my face. I’m sharing in hope that it has the same effect on you. To you, genuine hunters, I say good luck and good harvest. To the truck driving, gun carrying, beer drinking city boys, I say get lost.

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Habs’ Success Comes At A Price

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Remember the days when goaltending was winning Stanley Cups in Montreal? Back when Jacques Plante was the back bone of the team in the 60’s? Or when Ken Dryden, although playing behind a pretty darn good defense, was stellar and could be counted on as a key player in the 70’s? Perhaps you haven’t had the fortune to watch those guys, but you were born to see Patrick Roy work miracles in the late 80’s and early 90’s? No? Then you had to be alive when Carey Price earned just about every hardware available in the NHL back in 2015, right?

Truth be told, goaltending is a key position and has been on this team for as long as its glorious history goes back. Team General Manager Marc Bergevin knew that he had a special player in his hands in Price and he didn’t hesitate to make him the richest goaltender of all-time with an shiny eight-year, $84 million contact which kicks in this season. Unfortunately for Bergevin, his star goaltender is losing his mojo and when you invest so much into one player, you are fully entitled to expect him to be the best player on your team. No ifs and buts about it.

After signing that lucrative contract over a year ago, Price was not only below average last season, he was amongst the worst starting goaltenders in the entire NHL statistically speaking. A lot was explained due to an under-performing group, particularly the defensive corp in front of him but to Price’s own admission, he can do much better.

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Bergevin has invested a lot of money on Carey Price

After the season, Bergevin spoke about the “attitude” in the dressing room having to change. His comment wasn’t clear back then but it certainly got clearer during the summer months when he traded Alex Galchenyuk, a talented goals’ scorer also known for taking shifts and nights off. And it then became crystal clear when rumours got rampant about captain Max Pacioretty being on the block, leading to his departure for Las Vegas a few weeks ago. Anyone will tell you that Pacioretty looked disinterested last season, and he gave up on his team, at least effort-wise. Connor McDavid was playing on a bad team and he never took a shift off. That’s the attitude Bergevin was referring to.

We folks, Price also gave up on his team. Like Pacioretty, his body language and effort-level clearly showed his disinterest. His second and third effort that we were accustomed to seeing since the arrival of goaltending coach Stéphane Waite, they were gone and were replaced by the old habits of ‘going through the motions’.

Hybrid vs Butterfly

I’ve been following the career of Carey Price since the Canadiens drafted him back in 2005 and I was fortunate to live in Western Canada, home of the WHL and the Tri-City Americans, where Price played his junior years. I’ve loved and supported the guy since then and I became rather angry at Roland Melanson who tried changing Price’s style to a pure butterfly, almost ruining him in my opinion. You see, back in junior, Price was mix between what we call the hybrid style (Martin Brodeur) and the butterfly style (Patrick Roy) and Melanson only knew the later, so he started messing up with Price’s natural style, what made him the goalie that he was. This lead to Price’s struggles in the early going of his career. The truth is to be successful in the NHL, you have to make slight adjustments to a goalie’s style, not start from scratch. As soon as  you start thinking too much instead of relying on instincts, the puck is behind you as a goalie.

Bergevin hired someone in Waite who can work with many styles, someone who will teach mental preparation, raise the ‘compete level’ and fix minor bad habits. While the NHL thought they had found ‘the book’ on Price by scoring high, glove side, Waite also fixed that at the time. Under Waite, Price returned to being his old self, a mix of hybrid and butterfly. He stood on shots coming from far with no traffic in front. He went to a butterfly when there was traffic in front to cover most of the net. He was fighting for every puck. He was getting in his opponents’ head.

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Price needs to refocus and listen to Waite

Last year though, for whatever reason, we noticed Price reverting to his Melanson style. Beat up glove side more often than not, compete level non-existant (for the most part), a real change in attitude and it lead to the dismal season we saw from him. It’s like he stopped listening to Waite, or he didn’t care anymore. I would be willing to bet that he was one of the athletes on the team Bergevin was pointing the finger to with the ‘attitude’ comment and that the goalie and the GM had a heart-to-heart before summer. The Canadiens invested too much money in him for Price to drop the ball on them like that and it was made clear.

Unfortunately for the team and for the fans, I’m noticing the same style in this pre-season and that folks, doesn’t look good. It’s a bad vibe. He is on his knees on every shot again, no matter where it comes from. He’s getting beat high, glove side too often. His lateral movement is slow and his compete level… well… non-existant. True that he doesn’t have Calgary’s defense ahead of him, or Nashville’s, or San Jose’s, but he’s certainly supposed to be superior to Mike Smith, Pekka Rinne and Martin Jones too. And he’s getting paid accordingly!

Price has been vastly outplayed by Antti Niemi so far, and seems to be battling more to the level of Charlie Lindgren for the backup spot. I’m talking performances here folks. There’s no way Price isn’t the starter in Montreal. He is very much capable to returning to form. But he’s certainly raising red flags for yours truly. The team in front of him is hard working team and they need their best player to join the ranks because right now, we’re far from Plante, Dryden or Roy’s calibre of play. Go Habs Go!

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Only Two Options for Kotkaniemi

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Who said life was easy and that decisions were straightforward, that things were black or white? We’re all faced with though decisions, wondering if we made the right one. Whether it’s about the post-secondary school you are going to attend or the subject you’ll be taking, or the job offers, the woman or man in your life, it’s hard to know for sure what to do. Just yesterday, I bought a new (to me) truck and I had a hard time picking between two. I still don’t know if I made the right decision but at some point, one has to make that difficult decision. Hockey is no different for people in the business, for those who have to balance what’s good for a player, a team, in the short, medium or long term.

Marc Bergevin and the Montreal Canadiens are weeks away from having to make that difficult decision once again with a couple of their top prospects. As they decided to keep Alex Galchenyuk with the big club as an 18 year-old in his rookie season, they are facing the same dilemma with Nick Suzuki and Jesperi Kotkaniemi. In the case of Suzuki, they have two choices: back to junior or stay in Montreal. Because of regulations between junior clubs, the AHL and the NHL, he cannot play for the Laval Rockets. If I had to bet money, I’d say that he will play one more year junior but your guess is as good as mine.

Kotkaniemi’s situation is slightly different in the sense that since he’s not coming from junior hockey, he can go to the AHL and be developed by newly hired coach Joël Bouchard. So for him, there are three choices: the NHL, the AHL or back to Ässät in the Liiga Finnish Elite League, where he played last season, cumulating 29 points in 57 games as an 18 year-old. And that’s where Bergevin and his management group have to be very careful as they cannot afford to let this one slip as did Galchenyuk.

The consensus is that Kotkaniemi is proving not only to Habs’ fans and management, but to the entire NHL that being picked third overall wasn’t a stretch. He is improving with every exhibition game he’s playing in, showcasing his great hockey IQ. He has the skills, the demeanour and frame to play in the NHL today. He just needs to add some meat on his teenage bones. Standing at 6-foot 2-inches, he only weighs 184 lbs and playing against the biggest, fastest and strongest players in the world, it’s a huge risk for injuries.

The AHL option

Kotkaniemi’s situation is not without reminding me of an Edmonton Oilers former first overall pick. Ryan Nugent-Hopkins had the talent to play in the NHL. He had the smarts, the speed, the hands and the height to play at that level. What he didn’t have quite yet is the weight… and he spent a few years on the injured list. Some around the NHL, particularly the Oilers, will argue that it slowed down his development. Had he had the option of playing in Europe against men, things could have been different for him. He was too strong for junior, not physically mature enough for the NHL.

Personally, I would strongly suggest that the AHL is not the place for the Canadiens’ top prospect. When the NHL, in their ‘wisdom’, decided to go to a two-referees system, they not only killed consistency by putting two different judgments on the ice, but they added incompetent people in places where they have no business being in. Worse, it created a ripple effect in every single league below. Guys who shouldn’t be in the AHL are now officiating in that league, at a level over their head, creating a dangerous situation for players down there.

Sending Kotkaniemi to play under Bouchard would be ideal as he would be at proximity to better monitor his ice time, his game situation and he could receive a call-up if or when need be. It would also throw him to the wolves, playing against men who have aspirations to make a name for themselves and showing the kid what North American hockey is all about. Opposing coaches would be targeting him in their game plan and you can bet that intimidation would be in their plan to get him out of his game… or out of the game. As a matter of fact, I would venture to say that the NHL is a better option than the AHL.

NHL or Ässät

KotkaniemiAssatOn the other hand, the best option for the Canadiens’ young protege would be the Finish Elite League, playing under his father Mikael, who playing him on the wing last season, but who already said that he’s willing to put him at centre if that’s the Habs’ brass’ wish. Playing on the bigger ice surface, where he can continue working on his skating and puck skills, would be in my opinion not only the best option, but the only option if Bergevin and coach Claude Julien judge that he needs some maturing. In addition, the team would keep him one more year under their control as his professional contract would be differed.

In the meantime, we will enjoy watching this kid continue to strut his stuff, getting an entire fanbase excited about the prospect of having him centre one of the top lines, possible with Suzuki and other top centre prospect Ryan Poehling. Go Habs Go!

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Time To Put Up or Shut Up For Habs’ Hopefuls

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North America, both in Canada or in the United States, is known as the land of opportunities. This is where people are entitled to dream. Where people can hope to make it big, whether it be in business, on the movie screen, in pro-sports. While in most environments, opportunity can come knocking at any time in one’s life, the same cannot necessarily be said in hockey, a league already known for giving chances to younger and younger players each year, or so it seems. For some of them, the window is already starting to close before they will have to make important decisions when it comes to their future in hockey… or elsewhere.

The Montreal Canadiens have a few of those players, those who have turned pro a few years ago. While every opportunity is important, this 2018 training camp is particularly crucial for a few Habs’ hopefuls as time is running out and other younger prospects are pushing hard behind them for their own opportunity. Let’s have a look at the most prominent in this year’s crop for the Habs, as they are getting ready to hit the ice for what could be the last time wearing the red, white and blue.

Byron Froese (1991) – C

After bouncing from the AHL with short stints in the NHL, he managed to crack the Habs’ line-up last season with a career high 48 games with the Canadiens. Sound defensive player, the fact that he is playing centre on a team desperately seeking help at that position helped him, but he did steal the job from veteran Torrey Mitchell. He is one who won’t be pleased to see Tomas Plekanec coming back and Matthew Peca coming into play. To make matters worse, Jacob de la Rose seems ripe for a breakout season. At 27 years of age, time is the essence for him.

Simon Després (1991) – LD

Després is a different kind of bird all together. Once seen as a top prospect with the Penguins and the Ducks, he already has just under 200 NHL games under his belt. Injuries, particularly concussion issues, have contributed to his set-back and the 27 year-old signed a Professional Try-Out contract so he’s a good gamble for the Canadiens and if anyone could help get his career on track, it might just be Joël Bouchard. The skills are there. The confidence and ability to put it all together is what’s lacking here.

Michael Chaput (1992) – C

Chaput has been on the fringe with both the Blue Jackets and the Canucks and at 26, the native of Île Bizard, QC, is hoping that some home cooking will have the same effect on him as it has on Nicolas Deslauriers. Standing at 6-foot 2-inches, he has the size, grit, determination and physicality to be a great agitator. Further, he is very versatile and can be counted on in all situations in all three zones. He signed a two year, two-way contract with the Canadiens this summer.

Kenny Agostino (1992) – LW

Agostino is a newcomer in the Canadiens’ organisation and the 26 year-old is a prolific points producer at the AHL level, but has yet to be able to put it all together in the NHL. Like the other players brought in this summer, Agostino has, you guessed it, a solid two-way game to his repertoire. His game is based on speed and the 26 year-old winger likes to play an up-tempo game.

Xavier Ouellet (1993) – LD

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Xavier Ouellet

Ouellet is perhaps Marc Bergevin‘s most publicized acquisition of the summer after Max Domi. Born in Bayonne, France, the former QMJHL star has 145 career NHL games under his belt with the Detroit Red Wings. The 25 year-old excels at moving the puck up ice. He has excellent mobility from the back end, as well as some offensive ability. He also owns an accurate point shot. Like Chaput, he and the Canadiens’ organisation are hoping that some home cooking will launch his career for good.

Hunter Shinkaruk (1994) – C

I hesitated putting a 23 year-old on that list but this will be Shinkaruk’s third team already. Recently acquired in a trade with the Flames for Kerby Rychel, Shinkaruk was once perceived as one of the Canucks’ blue-chip prospects. In his post-trade assessment of the trade which saw the youngster traded to Calgary, Canucks’ GM Jim Benning told the press that they had analyzed his goals in the AHL and figured that it wouldn’t translate to offense at the NHL level. Fans in Vancouver were very upset at Benning for trading him. It now remains to be seen if Bergevin hit a homerun with this one, or if it’s another one of his low-risk, possible high-reward moves.

Rinat Valiev (1995) – LD

Acquired from the Maple Leafs along with Rychel and the Leafs’ second round pick in 2018 (Jacob Olofsson) in the trade for Plekanec, Valiev owns excellent size (6-foot 3-inches, 215 pounds), plus the ability to use it to shutdown opponents as well as play a physical game. He does have some offensive ability. He is only 23 but the Canadiens’ defense is starting to get pretty crowded with guys with his abilities so he will need to step up his game in order to earn himself a spot.

Michael McCarron (1995) – C/RW

What hasn’t been said about McCarron that could be added here without sounding redundant? Again, we’re talking about a 23 year-old here but would a 6-foot 6-inches, 231 pounds towering forward with power-forward acumen clear wavers if sent down? In my opinion, the Canadiens need to stop trying to make him a centre and play him on the wing, where he can be more efficient. This will be a very important training camp for the Michigan-born young man, one that could very well determine his future with this organization.

 

Don’t believe the anti-Bergevin naysayers forks: the Canadiens’ organization is on the right path and even THEY know it. They simply don’t want to see him succeed for reasons that are well beyond hockey matters. The depth in the organisation is as good as it’s been in many years and the prospect pool is in the Top-6 in the entire NHL according to Corey Pronman, prospects specialist for The Athletic. With competition comes pressure to perform and with that, a team full of players who will have to give their all every day, not to lose their jobs to others who want it just as much. Go Habs Go!

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Top Candidates For a Break-Through Season

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Late August… Back to school sales are full on, as teachers and students are preparing for another year. Summer seasonal businesses are trying to squeeze in every last dollar before the long winter ahead. Hunters, like yours truly, are getting butterflies as they prepare their equipment for the upcoming hunting season, dreaming of a good harvest. And hockey fans are getting excited to finally see their team back on the ice, putting away summer speculation and see first hand the newcomers in action, dreaming of a long playoffs’ run comes next Spring.

Canadiens’ General Manager Marc Bergevin didn’t make as big of a splash as everyone seemed to expect by season’s end, as team captain Max Pacioretty, who will be entering the last year of his contract, is still a member of the Habs this late in August and it looks like they might just keep him. But gone is enigmatic Alex Galchenyuk, being replaced by hard-working Max Domi after a deal consumed with the Arizona Coyotes. In a separate deal, Bergevin made great use of his cap space as the Canadiens acquired Joel Armia, Steve Mason – whom the Canadiens bought out immediately – and a seventh-round pick in the 2019 NHL Draft and a fourth-round selection in the 2020 NHL Draft in exchange for 21 year-old defenseman Simon Bourque, who had 3 assists in 46 games with Laval of the American Hockey League last season.

 

It’s been a while it seems since the Canadiens held their rookies Development Camp where we got to see 40 of the team’s best prospects. And we will get to see several of them again as they will be invited to represent the Habs at the NHL Rookie Showdown 2018 in just a few weeks, the tournament being held on September 7th, 8th and 9th at Place Bell in Laval.

“This Showdown, featuring several promising young players from three Canadian teams, gives us an opportunity to monitor the development and witness the progression of the rookies within our organization in a competitive environment, while giving our fans a chance to see the Canadiens of tomorrow in action,” said Canadiens general manager, Marc Bergevin.

Ready to make an impact?

The NHL is a huge step from any other league in the world and players soon realize it. While playing in the NHL is a dream come through for most players, several of them are driven to making an impact on their team and having a long, successful career. There are always disappointments, players who simply cannot live up to expectations that they, or others, put on themselves. Then you have the surprises, the late bloomers who end up making their GMs and/or scouting departments look like geniuses. For higher picks, it’s just a matter of time to come into their own, find their game and reach the potential most had seen in them for a while now.

The Canadiens are no different. In their ranks, underdogs like Paul Byron and Brendan Gallagher have found their niche in the NHL wearing the red, white and blue. Others like Carey Price and Pacioretty took a few years to find their game, only to become impact players in this league. But which of today’s crew are the next Gallagher, Byron, Price, Pacioretty?…

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Max Domi and Brendan Gallagher will be fun to watch this season.

The Canadiens form one of the NHL’s youngest teams, particularly at the forward position, and the vast majority of that group is reaching the age where they should be set to turn the corner in their career, become the players expect them to become. I’m purposely leaving out Domi and Jonathan Drouin who, by the new NHL standards, are considered ‘young veterans’, but both can certainly become impact players on this team. I would rather focus on a few others who, in my humble opinion, are on the verge of becoming key contributors to this Canadiens’ team, one in desperate need of fresh air after a very disappointing 2017-18 season. Here are my picks, in order, of the young players who will surprise many observers, particularly those who are already writing-off the Canadiens’ season:

5- Charles Hudon has been compared to Tomas Plekanec in the past and the veteran had taken the rookie under his wing last season, both literally and figuratively speaking. Plekanec is back for one last kick at the can and he will get a chance to further help Hudon who could very well copy the Czech’s career development. Plekanec had 9 goals and 29 points in his rookie season, and followed up with 20 goals and 47 points the following season. Hudon finished last season with 10 goals and 30 points… He has shown flashed of what he can do, he only needs to find a bit more consistency in his game and Plekanec is a great mentor, a true pro to follow.

4- After surprising everyone with 18 goals in his first season, Artturi Lehkonen is ready to bounce back from a rather disappointing second year in the NHL. If his last 15 games of the season are any indication, where he scored seven of his 12 goals, the young Fin should be able to make more of an impact, particularly that he is no liability on the ice and can be used in all situations in all three zones. While there is no doubt that he is a quality NHL caliber player, the jury is still out when it comes to his offensive potential and Habs’ fans could very well see him become a consistent 20-25 goals’ scorer on this team.

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Mike Reilly could open some eyes in Montreal this season.

3- Many look at Victor Mete when they think of young puck-moving up-comers on the Habs but Mike Reilly is, in my opinion, closer to having the biggest impact. More experienced, bigger and older, Reilly never got a chance to play quality minutes in a deep Minnesota defensive core and he showed some great things after the trade. Don’t be fooled by the fact that the Canadiens paid very little to acquire him folks, as for having seen him play for a full season here in Penticton, this guy is as talented as they come. It’s just a matter of confidence: from the coach to utilise him regularly, and from himself to believe in his game. He could very well be Shea Weber‘s defense partner when the All-Star defenseman comes back from injury in late-November, early-December.

2- What hasn’t been said about Nikita Scherbak? In case you’ve been living under a rock for the past couple of years,  here’s a summary for you: Scherbak has an excellent shot and sound goal-scoring instincts. Standing at 6-foot 2-inches, he has a good frame for the NHL, possesses very good speed and a very high hockey IQ. He also displays some grit and forechecking acumen, with deceptive moves that will keep opposing defenders on their toes. He had 30 points in 26 games in an injury-plagued season in Laval last season. He will come to camp hungry and ready to show that he can be counted on to produce points at the NHL level.

1- In Winnipeg, Joel Armia was playing on a strong team, one with tons of quality depth at right-wing, as he was over-shadowed by the likes of team captain Blake Wheeler and young sensation Patrik Laine. Playing in the Western Conference with limited ice time behind the players named above, combined with the low price paid by the Canadiens are all contributors to the ‘under the radar’ steal Habs’ GM Bergevin made in that deal, at least in the eyes of the team’s casual and not-so-casual fans and media members. Standing at 6-foot 3-inches, Armia has good size for the NHL game, plus the soft hands and instincts of a natural sniper. He knows where to be to score goals and he also has great two-way upside.

Not-so-long shots

There are a few other notables to keep an eye on for next season, but left out of my Top-5 list. One of them is young veteran Jacob De la Rose. The 23 year-old performed extremely well for Team Sweden at the World Championships, playing a key role helping them win Gold. Need I mention Victor Mete, who will be entering his second season at the tender age of 20? Because of the signing of veteran backup Antti Niemi, few give goaltender Charlie Lindgren any chance of making the big club but he is ready to make a strong push to earn an NHL job. Last but not least, the Canadiens are giving a chance to defensemen Xavier Ouellet and Simon Després, both who have shown some great potential before suffering set-backs in their young career. They both do have the skills to have a positive impact on the Canadiens.

As summer months wind down, there is still plenty of time to enjoy the warm weather, the sunshine, the beach and summer sports. But just around the corner is yet another hockey season where, hopefully, this fanbase can rally and cheer this team on together instead of following the lead of a few divisive fans and media personalities. Go Habs Go!