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Under The Gun Video: It’s Not Racism!

Well folks, I’m trying something new, something I’ve never done before so please take it easy on me, beloved readers. As you will see, I have a perfect face for radio and you will also notice why I write and don’t work in television. Having said that, even old dogs like yours truly have to try to keep up with technology and this is my very first attempt at a videocast. This first one is about P.K. Subban being voted the most overrated player in the NHL, and mostly some of the reactions to that news. Here’s hoping you enjoy it, as it might become a more regular feature to Habsterix.com. Thank you for viewing and for sharing. Go Habs Go!

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Top Cheese: March 2019 Edition

Here are a few thoughts on different topics surrounding the Habs’ as the team is entering the exciting last stretch of the season, pushing for a spot in the playoffs. Four teams, including the Canadiens, are battling for the two Wild Card spots, three of which are also playing for the Metropolitan division’s third position, making for an exciting end to this regular season. Feel free to share on Social Media and post your comments as they are always welcomed.

Less than 20 percent of the 2018-2019 regular season is left to play for the Canadiens and they find themselves in a dog fight to get in and gain the rights to play either the Tampa Bay Lightning or the leaders of the Metro division in the first round of the playoffs. Only 16 games, that’s what it boils down to, and we will find out if there will be some playoffs’ hockey at the Bell Centre come April. Players are banged up, they’re tired, but their sight is on playing for at least a chance to compete for the elusive Stanley Cup.

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One of those players on the Canadiens is team captain Shea Weber, who missed most of last season and the first couple of months to this season. While his play hasn’t been as sharp lately as we’re accustomed to seeing from him, he is still the backbone of that Montreal defense. If the Canadiens are going to make the playoffs, a lot of it will be on the shoulders of the one they call Man Mountain… and no one relishes that more than Weber, a true competitor who has proven time and time again that he can be counted on when everything is on the line.

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Shea Weber and Carey Price

Which makes Claude Julien‘s decision against the Pittsburgh Penguins that much more puzzling. On Saturday night, he gave the duty to neutralize Sidney Crosby to the defense pairing of Jeff Petry and Jordie Benn, and Sid the Kid finished the night with… four points in a Pens’ 5-1 victory at the Bell Centre. For fans and media members, who are not privileged to inside information, this decision is mind boggling at the very least and, in my humble opinion, could end up being the difference between making or missing the playoffs when it’s all said and done.

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But one would be foolish to blame it all is on Julien. Marc Bergevin has yet to address the team’s biggest need, finding a suitable partner for Weber, a left-handed defenseman who can log big minutes in a shutdown role against opponents’ top lines. Victor Mete is doing okay but when you have to rely on Mike Reilly or Benn on your top-4, it exposes the glaring need at that position. With the trade deadline come and gone, that gaping hole is still there and ultimately, the Canadiens are paying for it.

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The truth is that the Canadiens are greatly missing Andrei Markov. Maybe not Markov at his age, but a Markov-type player. Someone with his passing abilities, someone with his vision, a left-handed shot who can dish the puck from the point on the powerplay… but we’ll get back to that later on. Seeing the Habs with over nine million dollars under the cap and the GM’s inability to fill that hole in the summer or at trade deadline, perhaps Bergevin could have given the Russian defenseman a contract? Hindsight being 20-20, of course.

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All is not lost however, at least not for the mid to short term. Much like we’ve seen with Jonathan Drouin, the discussions held at the trade deadline often carry over to the Summer months and one can only hope that Bergevin’s talks for a quality left defenseman can pay off in the off-season. Could a Jonas Brodin, a Cam Fowler, a Shayne Gostisbehere, a Hampus Lindholm or another similar defenseman be coming in the summer? We can’t rule that out.

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Jesperi Kotkaniemi

Yes, Alexander Romanov might be on the verge of coming to North America. Yes, Josh Brook has played on his off-side for a bit. But it’s far from ideal. Mostly, it’s unrealistic to expect a green rookie to fill that role. The Canadiens are better off doing the right thing, as they are doing with young Jesperi Kotkaniemi, and bring those guys up slowly and protect them with favourable matchups. As they should try to hang onto them instead of trading them for temporary help, the team MUST resist the temptation of rushing their top young talent. This also means that they must find some sort of stop-gap.

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One options that might be available is putting an offer in to pending UFA Jake Gardiner or the Maple Leafs, who will likely be unable to resign him. But is giving Gardiner, a very ordinary defenseman defensively, a guy who has been the scapegoat in Toronto more often than not, a contract in the seven million dollar range a smart move? Allow me to doubt it. In my opinion, Bergevin is better off sacrificing some assets and pick and chose the defenseman that he truly wants through a trade. Someone with a more cap-friendly contract and with term left to it.

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Here’s something that I’ve read that really irks me… Why trade to improve this year when the team doesn’t have a shot at the Stanley Cup, if others teams like Tampa Bay are stronger? Then why play the season then? Why want to make the playoffs? Why did the other teams fighting with the Habs for a playoffs’ spot trade to improve? If it’s pointless for the Habs, shouldn’t it be pointless for all other teams on the bubble? I’ll tell you why. When you are this close to a playoffs’ spot, you MUST try to get it. The experience gained by the young Canadiens would be most valuable in the long run. And I remember 1986 as if it was yesterday.

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In 1986, the Canadiens had no chance according to everyone around the NHL. But they had a great young goaltender and some young kids who didn’t know better. They had a balanced offense with multiple players around the 20 goals mark. Mostly though, they made the playoffs, giving them a chance to be in a position to battle for Lord Stanley. When you don’t make the playoffs, your chances are zero percent. Even a couple percentage points are better than zero. So folks, unless you have a crystal ball, stop pretending that you know better. You are talking odds and those odds can be beaten. It’s been proven time and time again in pro sports.

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Perhaps the most amazing thing about this season’s Canadiens is the fact that they are in the position that they are in, without a powerplay worth being called that. Sitting at a league worst 12.4 percent, the Habs have been unable to fix that issue all season long. But that doesn’t mean that it can’t start clicking. You see, a lot of it is playing on the players’ mind. They are making poor passing choices, and the passes are often off for one-timers or to keep the opponents’ penalty killers honest. Confidence plays a huge role in hockey and if my five decades of hockey have taught me anything at all, it’s that it can change quickly… with a bit of success.

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One guy who has been playing great hockey is Max Domi, although not so much on the powerplay. While I personally predicted that he would do well, he is playing well beyond what anyone could have expected when the Canadiens made his acquisition. And he’s doing all of this at the centre position, as the team’s number one centre nonetheless, with few points on the powerplay. Anyone miss Alex Galchenyuk… and his father?

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When the Canadiens acquired Jonathan Drouin, he and Max Pacioretty started practicing together in the off-season, hoping to develop chemistry, a chemistry that never came about. The same cannot be said between Drouin and Domi however. They started the season together and had great success, then got separated for a while but just recently, Julien put them back together and they started to produce again. Fast and creative, those two look for each other and it’s working. If only they could transpose that to the powerplay…

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Even a few percentage points improvement on the powerplay would go a long way to improving the Habs’ chances to make the playoffs but let’s be real here… their odds dropped drastically after losing that game against the Penguins. It is my opinion that they will fall just short of their quest and had Bergevin brought in some help at the deadline, and Julien made a better decision against Pittsburgh, this team would be part of the Spring Showdown.

What’s done is done and we can only look at the future. Bergevin must address the team’s needs on left defense as he’s done with the centre position this past summer. If he does that and if the team avoids key injuries, the Canadiens should be in the playoffs next season. Until then, let’s put that under the “experience gaining” category. Go Habs Go!

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Coaching Decision Costs The Habs Against Pittsburgh

Sometimes, we as fans give too much credit to the coaches. Sometimes, it’s the opposite. As Barry Trotz is proving once again, coaching makes a world of difference, especially when players “buy into the system”. Some decisions work, others well… not so much. The best coaches however will adapt throughout a game. He will recognize what works and what doesn’t and will adjust on the fly. As Albert Einstein once said: “The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again, but expecting different results.”

Claude Julien is a good coach, let’s be totally clear about that. He’s a coach who can adapt and he’s proven that this season, when he totally changed the Canadiens’ style of play. They are now an exciting team to watch… most nights. Last night was the Canadiens’ single most important game of the season against a team that was fighting directly with them for the last playoffs’ spots. A team that can count on the best player in the world: Sidney Crosby.

Sidney Crosby had a heyday against Jeff Petry and Jordie Benn.

Prior to the game, Penguins’ head coach Mike Sullivan submits his starting line-up. He wants to make a statement, start the game on the right foot, so he puts Crosby’s line on the ice to start the game. Claude Julien is made aware of that and he decides to oppose… Jeff Petry and Jordie Benn against them. Results? Benn turns the puck over, Crosby takes full advantage and seconds into that crucial game, gives his team a 1-0 lead.

Petry and Benn was a combination that was tried at times this season (and last) and it never worked. They are not compatible and we, as fans, have noticed that. Reuniting them was mind boggling to start with. Putting them up against Crosby, when he has Shea Weber, arguably the best shutdown defenseman at his disposition, was insanity.

To make matters worse, Julien kept with this matchup all night. The results? A four points night for Crosby and a 5-1 shellacking at the hands of Pittsburgh in front of a dumbfounded crowd at the Bell Centre. And the Habs can’t use the excuse that they had played the night before as the Penguins also played on Friday night. No excuses… except a bad, bad game plan by the coach who was too stubborn to adjust and react seeing that it wasn’t working. This loss in the most important game of the season, it’s not on Benn, Petry, Domi, Price, Weber and company. This loss is solely on Claude Julien.

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Bergevin Has Let His Players Down

Sometimes, inaction is an action that speak louder than anything. It can be a good thing, or it can blow back in your face. Admittedly, some inactions are however better than bad actions. In some case though, inaction can be the equivalent of becoming stagnant, even taking a step back in a particular moment, especially when those around you have all moved forward. If you’re standing still and everyone else is moving forward, you still have lost ground.

All through summer, Marc Bergevin was on the hot seat. Not only had he failed to bring his team to the next level but according to some, the team had regressed. At the start of the season, even after the moves that he made in the summer, fans and media were sceptical about his acquisitions. After all, he had traded his top two goals’ scorers for guys whose production was nowhere close to them. He hadn’t improved his porous defense. The expectations? What expectations? The once glorious Montreal Canadiens were going to be a lottery team with good odds to get the 1st overall pick, everyone thought.

Well this group of players, led by captain Shea Weber, his assistants Brendan Gallagher and Paul Byron, and room leader Carey Price, decided otherwise. They took matter into their own hands and they were going to prove everyone wrong and that, they certainly did. To the point where at the trade deadline, they found themselves in a playoffs’ position.

History repeats itself

Trade deadline comes and players are secretly hoping to get some help, a bit of a reward for their had work, for their dedication. Something to get them over the hump. What did they get this season? Fourth line help and a seventh or eighth defenseman. Yes, Christian Folin, Nate Thompson, Dale Weise and Jordan Weal were added to the roster by Bergevin. Players are looking at this knowing full well that their biggest needs were someone to help spark their anemic powerplay, and a left-handed defenseman to eat up big minutes on the top-4. The got nothing, nata.

Canadian country music star Terri Clark once said:

The best thing to do is stare it in the face and move on. We have to face our fears and plow through. I think taking chances takes a lot more courage than staying stagnant and doing what’s safe and comfortable.

And this is not the first time that Marc Bergevin is playing it safe at the trade deadline. There seems to be a pattern here and players aren’t stupid. They see it. At least those who were here when it happened before.

The 2014-2015 season was the last time Bergevin gave them some substantial help. With his team sitting second overall, he acquired Jeff Petry from the Edmonton Oilers, to play behind P.K. Subban. As is his trademark, he also fortified his fourth line by adding Brian Flynn and Torrey Mitchell. Results? They lost to the Tampa Bay Lightning in the second round of the playoffs but that wasn’t because Bergevin did nothing.

Carey Price and Shea Weber could have used some much needed help.

The following year, Carey Price injured his knee and only played 12 games to start the season. With Price in the line-up, the Canadiens were sitting seventh in the NHL’s overall standings. Bergevin waited to December 28th to get help and instead of getting a quality goaltender, he traded for… Ben Scriven. He never addressed the need, never adjusted all season long and that was a huge let down for the players. No one can replace Price, everyone knows that, but to expect Scriven to come anywhere close the the All-Star netminder’s level of play is mind boggling. The Habs finished 22nd overall that year, well out of a playoffs’ spot.

In 2016-2017, the Canadiens were sitting in eighth place overall by trade deadline day with 78 points in 64 games. At the deadline, here’s the help Bergevin gave his players: An aging Steve Ott, Dwight King, Andreas Martinsen, Brandon Davidson and… Jordie Benn. With deficiencies covered by the play of Price (who had a strong finish to the season) the Habs managed to maintain their pace but were eliminated by the New York Rangers after Chris Kreider took Price out of the series.

Last season, the Canadiens suffered a huge loss when it was announced that Shea Weber had broken his foot in the very first game of the season and was shut down for the season after only 26 games into it. How did Bergevin react? He waited, picked up Mike Reilly by the deadline and… became a seller. Only the Buffalo Sabres, the Ottawa Senators and the Arizona Coyotes finished the season with a worse record than the Habs.

Jump to February 25th, 2019… The Canadiens are battling for a playoffs’ spot. Claude Julien‘s team has won only two of its last eight games, allowing on average almost four goals per game and their powerplay sits second last in the NHL with a 12.7% success rate. Their recent slump has allowed the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Boston Bruins to distance themselves, when the three teams were nose to nose just a few days back. What did Bergevin do? He went and changed his fourth line. The powerplay help didn’t come and the blatant hole on the left side of the defense is still has gaping as it has been all year.

In the meantime, the teams battling with the Canadiens bolstered their roster. The players see that…. and it could very well cost them to miss the playoffs when it’s all said and done.

Having said all of that, While it’s okay to be upset to see that the Habs didn’t add any major asset(s) at the deadline, we do need to remind ourselves that they also didn’t give away any major asset(s) either. Also, rest assured that Bergevin has planted important seeds in the last few days and sometimes, those come to tuition in the off season. Nothing lost, except a playoffs’ appearance in my opinion, and some valuable playoffs’ experience for the young players on the team. Let’s just hope that the players don’t give up on Bergevin the way he sort of did on them. Go Habs Go!